Fukushima Crisis Is Completely Over After One Year (NOT!)

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[Fukushima NukeBlog Index| Radiation On Children's Shoes]

This piece from the World Nuclear Association, which is a platform for apologists of the Nuclear Power Industry is unbelievable in the extent they present the opposite of the MASS NUCLEAR DEATH scenario, which is EVERYTHING IS COMPLETELY UNDER CONTROL scenario which isn’t exactly spot on either. I am reposting their piece with my comments. There is no mention of the massive damage to reactor buildings by explosions at units 1,3 and 4 which destroyed all of the cranes and platforms needed to remove intact radioactive fuel rods, or mention that there is no known procedure to remove melted corium fuel from the bottom of flooded containments. TEPCO’s 40 year schedule is based on decommissioning an intact reactor. It is probably impossible to safely dismantle Fukushima or restore the economy of the surrounding lands anytime in the forseeable future

Starting with the unbelievable conclusion: 

Conclusion

While by any measure the accident at Fukushima Daiichi has been severe and has negatively impacted the lives of a lot of people – particularly those who have had to evacuate {MORE LIKE RUINED THE LIVES OF 200,000 PEOPLE COMPLETELY AND LEFT A BIG HOLE IN THE GOVERNMENT WHICH IS PAYING FOR CLEANUP AND BAILOUT OF TEPCO}– the reactors are now properly under control (UNDER CONTROL? CRANES AND SYSTEMS TO REMOVE SPENT FUEL FROM POOLS WERE ALL DESTROYED AND NO KNOWN WAY TO REMOVE MELTED FUEL IN CONTAINMENT FLOOR??) and the situation at the site and in the surrounding areas is continuously improving due to the efforts of the site workers, decontamination experts and the Japanese people.

Fukushima Nuclear Accident: One Year On

 One year after an extreme natural disaster led to fuel melting at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant the situation is under control and the accident is officially over. {ARE YOU KIDDING?} Plant operator TEPCO is now focussed on decommissioning activities while the various levels of Japanese government are now concentrating on decontamination efforts, so that people evacuated in the early days of the accident can return home. {RETURN HOME TO AN ECONOMIC WASTELAND? YOU CAN’T SELL ANYTHING FROM 100 MILES FROM THE PLANT} This document summarises what has so far been accomplished in dealing with the accident, as well as listing the challenges that remain. {CHALLENGES? MORE LIKE IGNORING THE HUGE PROBLEMS}

How the accident developed

On the 11 March 2011 a powerful earthquake brought down power lines in the northeast of Japan. About an hour later a devastating tsunami flooded the coast, inundating the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant where it disabled backup generators at the site. {AND DESTROYED ALL OF THE CRITICAL COOLING SYSTEMS NEAR THE SHORE EVEN IF THE GENERATORS WERE NOT FLOODED} This started a chain of events that eventually caused fuel to melt at three of the six units (units 1-3) and caused serious structural damage to one more (unit 4). {PICTURE SHOWS THAT UNITS 5 AND 6 WHICH WERE HIEVEN HIGHER UP ON THE HILL WERE ALSO INUNDATED}This was the first time ever that a natural disaster has led to a serious nuclear accident {THAT WAS NEVER EVEN FORSEEN BY TEPCO OR INDUSTRY EXCEPT BY NUCLEAR ALARMISTS WHO HAPPENED TO BE RIGHT FOR ONCE}.  
Fukushima flooding

Fig 1: Satellite picture with estimation of tsunami inundation at the Fukushima site Source: TEPCO

The accident developed frenetically over the course of about a week and reached its worst point when several major {MAJOR???} airborne radioactive releases occurred beginning 15 March. A more thorough description of the early stages of the accident progression can be found in the Fukushima Accident Info Paper.
Since then, thanks to the tireless efforts of recovery workers, conditions at the site have improved to the point where the damaged reactors are now stable {MEANS IT’S AWFUL BUT AT LEAST NOT GETTING MUCH WORSE} and radioactive emissions are no longer a concern {OTHER THAN THE FACT THAT REACTOR BUILDINGS 1 AND 3 ARE TOO HOT FOR WORKERS TO ENTER, AND CONTAINMENTS 1, 2, 3 ARE IMPOSSIBLE TO ENTER AND WILL KILL PEOPLE IN AN INSTANT AND SENDING OUT SO MUCH RADIATION IT MESSES WITH ELECTRONIC CAMERAS AND GROUNDWATER IS MIXING WITH CONTAMINATED WATER IN BASEMENTS EMITTING 100MSV / HR}.

continued Fukushima Crisis Over – NOT!

see Fukushima Nuclear Accident: One Year On (World-Nuclear.org) for original article

About the Author

MIT electrical engineering computer science graduate has written conservative columns on politics, race / culture, science and education since the 70s in MIT The Tech and various publications in including New Republic and National Review.

3 Comments

  1. Stephen W Anderle

    If it is going to take several hours for the fuel rods to melt after they are exposed to air, why not have several tankers fitted with open tops with hinged lids and a water circulation system. Park them next to where the fuel pool is then have the crane lift them out one bundle at a time and lower them into the tanker on supports inside the tanker. should be able to get 3 or 4 in each tanker. with ba second layer of support 6 to 8. It should not take more than 20 mins maximum for each bundle. a good crane crew could do it in 5 to 1 mins. Then they could be hauled to a safer site and deeper water. Then the plant would be safer and easier to clean up.

    • James Johnson

      If a crane crew attempted that, they would be sacrifices. Getting close enough to do anything like that means certain death.

  2. Toby Marshall

    If you lift fuel assemblies out of the water the radiation will quickly kill anyone in the vicinity.

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